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174-175 CLARKSON'S MISSION TO AMERICA 1791-1792


the ground for the Town, but many of them are affected with fever & dysentery-

 March 16th - This day the Transports being cleared of their provisions, stores, and passengers, I invited the Captains to meet the Ladies & Gentlemen from the Company's ships to a dinner, I had provided on shore under a tent, as the last mark of attention I could pay them, for the kindness they had uniformly shewn to their passengers-A Turtle of 40 lbs weight was caught in the Amy's seine, and dressed for dinner-Finding myself extremely fatigued, I retired after dinner on board the Amy, where with the assistance of the Secretary of the Government and the Clerks, I prepared the papers, ready for signing to discharge the Transports tomorrow, requested the favour of Mr. Wickham to visit all the ships, to see that everything was taken out belonging to Government-Retired to bed extremely ill from the fatigue of going on shore

 March 17th - Mr. Wickham having reported to me that the stores of every kind were taken from the ships, I discharged all of them this day-I propose setting the whole of the Nova Scotian business, before I attend to that of the Colony, and shall insert all the papers attached to it, before I proceed with my journal-

 The Natives both Male & Female flock every day to the Settlement in great numbers, bringing with them such fruit as they find in the woods, which principally consist of Ananas, Bananas, Plantains, Limes, oranges Cassadas & c, these they exchange for biscuits, Beef, Soap and Spirits, which I am sorry to observe are ordered from the Stores in the greatest profusion & irregularity-Thermometer, in the shade 94, in the sun 1l4

 I cannot close the proceedings of this day without noticing the obligations I shall ever feel for the valuable service rendered to the cause, by my friend Lieut Wickham of the Navy; he volunteered his services in Nova Scotia to assist me in conducting the Transports by repeating my signals-To him I must ever feel indebted, not only for his unwearied arid kind attentions to me throughout the whole of my illness, whenever the weather would permit him to come on board, and when I reflect upon the state in which he found me, in the midst of my malady, and bring to my recollection as far as my memory will allow me & from the report of others, his kindness, as the most cleanly, active, and tender nurse, how he performed the duties, of the most attentive and valuable servant, and how alive he was to cleanliness, and the purification of the air which surrounded me, I am at a loss to express how much I feel, for such affectionate and kind treatment-To him was intrusted, with two of the Cornpany's clerks the whole management of landing the Colonists, checking the expenditure of stores and provisions on board the ships and making inventories of the surplus of every article remaining: & having reported to me that the stores of every kind were taken from the ships, I requested of the

(Richard Pepys) Council